Let Us…

The title of my message today is “Let us…” Not lettuce that you have as a part of a salad! But “let us” as in let us do this or let us do that together.

In the Bible the term “let us” is used on a number of occasions. In the very first chapter God as Father, Son and Holy Spirit says “Let us make man in our image” (Genesis 1:26-27). That is a positive example. A more negative example is found 10 chapters later. “Then they said, “Come, let us build ourselves a city, with a tower that reaches to the heavens, so that we may make a name for ourselves…” (Genesis 11:4). In 2 Samuel 10:12 it says, “Be strong, and let us fight bravely for our people and the cities of our God. The Lord will do what is good in his sight.” So we see the term “let us” can be used in both a positive way and a negative way. Like last week we said “let us have a service in Westonia”. We did and it was a really nice time as a church.

The passage I want to look at as our main text today is Hebrews 10:19-25. This passage looks at some key things that helps us to stay on track as individuals and as we do them together it helps us to stay of track as a church. I will also look at some other verses to fill in the things we need to do.

Bible Reading

Hebrews 10:19-25

Message Points

In this passage, it uses the term “Let us” four times. I am going to use this as the main points of my message today. Hopeful this will help you to remember and every time you re-read it, you will remember.

1. Let us draw near to God

Verse 22 – Let us draw near to God with a sincere heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled to cleanse us from a guilty conscience and having our bodies washed with pure water.

Today’s text tells us because of Christ’s death on the cross for us we can have confidence to enter the most holy place of God.

In Old Testament times the people had to sacrifice animals to be right with God. It was the shedding of the animal’s blood that placed a temporary covering of the persons sin. And we read in the Bible that only the High Priest could enter the most holy place where God’s presence was. After prayer, fasting and ritualistic behavior could he go in once a year. He had to wear elaborate garments with everything just right. Only one person, once a year.

Now we can enter in to the most holy place because of Christ and what He has done. His shed blood cleanses us from our sin and we are free to enter in. We can enter in any time.

Ephesians 3:12 tells us, “In him and through faith in him we may approach God with freedom and confidence.”

Hebrews 4:16 also says, “Let us then approach the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need.”

We can approach God with freedom and confidence. Drawing near to God is a key part of the Christian life. It is also a key component of church life. We have direct access to the Father through Christ. We can enter in.

Church, let us draw near to God. Because the Bible promises that if we draw near to God, He will draw near to us (James 4:6).

2. Let us hold tightly to our hope

Verse 23 – Let us hold tightly without wavering to the hope we affirm, for God can be trusted to keep his promise.

Let us hold tightly to our hope. The original Greek word used in the text means to hold down, keep, possess, retain, seize on, or stay. All of these give us the thought of holding tightly and not letting go.

What does the writer want us to take hold of? He wants us to take hold of the hope and faith we have in Christ. We know Christ is with us in this life and He helps us through. We also have a great hope that Jesus is coming back for us. We have a great hope of spending eternity with God. We have faith that all God says is true and correct and will come to pass.

As I was praying about hope this week I thought of the letters used in the word hope – H O P E. They can stand for “Hold Onto Promises Eternal”. That is really what hope is about.

Church, we know that life has a way of throwing curve balls at us. Some times bad things happen at the least expected time. We can be knocked down. But if we hold on to our hope, we can jump back up again, dust ourselves off and continue on. Hope acts like an anchor for our souls and the wind in our sails. It helps us moving forward with a confident expectation that God will do all He promised to do in His Word. The Bible tells us that all God’s promises are Yes and Amen in Christ (2 Corinthians 1:20). they are true and they will happen. Because the promises of God are sure and firm, we can hold on to our hope without wavering as the text says today.

So, let us hold of tightly to our hope.

3. Let us consider how to spur one another on

Verse 24 – Let us think of ways to motivate one another to acts of love and good works.

This is the third let us in this passage. There are two things I like in this verse. The first one is “let us think about ways”.

We should think about ways in which we can be more inspired to serve the Lord. Imagine if we all came to church thinking about how we could encourage someone. I am encouraged by hearing testimonies or praise reports of things that have been happening. I like to hear about the impact people are making in their work for the Lord. It inspires me on towards love and good deeds. Things like we have in our God Talk time where we share of Bible verses God has encouraged us with, breakthroughs we have had, and the impact we have made. It is not about big noting yourself. It is about encouraging others in their journey with the Lord and their service.

The second thing I like in this verse is, it uses the word motivate. So, what are the good deeds would should be motivated to do? When we use our gifts for the good of others. When we share our faith with others. When we give people a helping hand when they are in need. When we are a listening ear when someone is going through a hard time. When we help others grow in their faith. When we provide Bibles and resources for people who can’t afford them. When we take someone into our home who has nowhere to live. When we provide food for someone in need. There are endless things we can be inspired to do – things that are both practical and things that are spiritual. If we do them in love and with a heart to serve God, most good things we do would be considered good deeds.

So today before I go on to my last point. How can you we inspire each other? Who can you inspire on to love and good deeds?

Church, let us motivate one another to love and good deeds.

4. Let us not give up meeting together

Verse 25 – And let us not neglect our meeting together, as some people do, but encourage one another, especially now that the day of his return is drawing near.

Let us not give us meeting together as some are in the habit of doing. Habits are easy to form and a lot harder to break. Just as anyone who has ever started a diet or started to exercise knows. It is much easier to fall off the wagon, than get back on and stay on.

When I think about church attendance I think of Jesus. He is my Lord and Saviour, but He is also my example. Jesus was raised a Jew and He followed Jewish tradition. On the Sabbath, He went to the Temple or Synagogue.

Luke 4:16 tells us that, “He went to Nazareth, where he had been brought up, and on the Sabbath day he went into the synagogue, as was his custom. And he stood up to read.”

Jesus, as the Son of God, saw attendance on the Sabbath as important. I need to too. We all do.

Why is church attendance so important? Today’s text tells us that we need to encourage one another. In a world that can at times be so discouraging, we need encouragement regularly. We hear about wars, earthquakes, famines, tornadoes, floods and people just treating each other badly. We need a safe place to come to where we can see our friends and our church family and just enjoy the Bible, prayer, worship and fellowship. We need to fill up our encouragement tanks.

Years ago I heard of a story of a man who stopped attending church. Life’s circumstances had just got on top of him and he stopped going. People went over to see him but it didn’t help. One day the Pastor knocked on his door. The man let him in and they went and sat by the fire. The man did not speak and the Pastor remained silent too. They just sat and stared at the fire. After about 20 minutes the Pastor scooped at hot coal out of the fire and left it on the hearth. Slowly over the next 30 minutes it went cold and black. Still no words were spoken. Then all of a sudden the man stood up and shook the Pastor’s hand and said “Great sermon Pastor, I will see you Sunday”. The man realised for him to stay on fire in his faith he needed to be with the church, not at home by himself. The simple illustration of seeing the coal lose its fire made him realise, his faith was growing cold.

For us as Christians it is so vital to be here when we can or watch along online. We need to fill up our encouragement tanks and we need to love and support each other. After all we are all in this together. That is how God wants it to be.

Church, let us not forsake meeting together. Let us continue to meet and encourage each other as the return of Jesus comes closer each and every day.

Closing Summary

Today we have looked at Hebrews 10:19-25. A great passage that calls us to love God, and to love and encourage on another. We saw four main things.

1. We need draw near to God.

2. We need to hold tightly to our faith and hope in Christ.

3. We need to think of ways to encourage each other to love and good deeds.

4. We need to not forsake meeting together.

As a member of this congregation I need to commit to these things. We all do.

Amen

Mobile church

Last week we held our church service in another town. It is about 50km from where we live and regularly have church. We loaded everyone in to a bus or in cars and headed out.

We started doing this as an outreach and because we have some people who live in Westonia who come to our church each week. It makes it easier for them to invite their friends to church.

After a nice service we had a Fathers Day picnic at the local undercover area. We sat, talked, ate and had a quiz. It was a really nice way to do church.

So far this year we have done it twice that I have been to. Both times it was really fun. It is something I hope we continue to do as a church.

If you are interested you can watch the service above.

The nails of love

Communion: The nails of love

In John 20:26-27 we see that Jesus appears to Thomas. Thomas had said he would not believe Jesus was alive until he saw the nail marks. As we know Jesus then appears and shows Thomas the scars.

This passage got me thinking about Jesus being nailed to the cross and the type of nails that were used.

When we look at the Greek word used for nails in that passage it is helos (hay-los). It is not a little nail that you use to tack a back on a bookshelf. It is more like a large peg or nail used to hold railways tracks down to a railway sleeper. They are huge.

After a little more research I found that a typical nail used in a crucifixion was between 10 and 20 centimetres long. They were more like this (hold up railway spike).

When I think about that I can’t imagine that being driven through my hands or wrists or my feet or ankle bones, depending on how one was crucified. I can’t comprehend someone doing that for me…but Jesus did. He endured the nails of love.

Jesus could not live with the idea that your and my sin separated us from God.
So He endured the nails of love.

Jesus could not live with the idea that you would not be redeemed and set free from the curse of sin and death.
So He endured the nails of love.

Jesus could not live with the idea of you not experiencing His peace, hope and abundant life now.
So He endured the nails of love.

And Jesus could not live with the idea of you not spending eternity with Him.
So He endured the nails of love.

Let us remember today the love Jesus has for us and the lengths He was prepared to go to for us to be in relationship with Him.

Before I ask the helpers to come forward I want to symbolically nail in three nails to remind us of what Jesus did for us all. What Jesus did for you and I.

Be Prepared: Taking the fear out of sharing your faith

Today the title of my message is, “Be Prepared: Taking the fear out of sharing your faith”.

As a new Christian, and a number of times since, the thought of evangelism has been a pretty scary thing. I was told that I needed to share my faith so I could reach other people for Christ. And the more people I reached, the sooner it would be for Jesus to come back. This made me very nervous. It was something I wanted to do, but I felt terribly under-equipped. From talking to others, I found I was not alone.

We have all heard those verses that say, “Go and make disciples of all nations” (Matthew 28:18-20) and “And if someone asks about your Christian hope, always be ready to explain it” (1 Peter 3:15). For some this is very exciting, for other this brings fear to their hearts!

Over the years I have found that I have learned a lot about sharing my faith. I found there were certain things that helped me be a little bit more prepared. This took a lot of the stress out of sharing my faith. Today I want to share some of those things. As I go through them I am going to share some of my successes and some of my failures.

I want this message to be really practical and helpful to us and hopefully give us some pointers to sharing our faith.

1. Pray for the Holy Spirit to move in people’s lives

The first key we need to understand to be more effective in sharing our faith is praying the Holy Spirit to move.

John 16:8 – And when He comes, He will convict the world of its sin, and of God’s righteousness, and of the coming judgement.

It is the Holy Spirit’s role to do the work of salvation.

When I meet new people I always pray and ask God if this is someone I should share my faith with. If it is someone I need to talk to, I usually find I have the desire to pray for them and opportunities to talk about spiritual things tend to open up in a natural way.

When I am praying for someone I ask the Holy Spirit to move in their lives. I pray five general things.

  1. God would bless them and protect them.
  2. That the Holy Spirit would draw them to Jesus Christ
  3. That the Holy Spirit would show them their sin.
  4. That the Holy Spirit would make them aware of the need for a Saviour.
  5. That they would accept Jesus as their Lord and Saviour.

So this might be an example of how I pray for someone.

Dear God, I pray for __________. I pray that You will bless them, protect them and watch over them. I pray that the Holy Spirit would move in their lives. Holy Spirit please reveal Jesus to them. Open their hearts and minds to Him. I pray that you will make them aware of their need for a Saviour. Please show them their sin and the need to deal with it. I pray they will trust Jesus as their Lord and Saviour. Amen.

I have found that if God puts someone on my heart to pray this for, before long they are talking to me about spiritual things and they have a tract and a Bible in their hands.

2. Prepare a Testimony

A testimony can bring the Bible to life. I have found that people love hearing stories of how God has done great things for you. When I share about my testimony I touch on three main areas. These three things really help me to structure my story and how Jesus’ story impacted and changed my life.

  • My life before Christ – I share things like how I felt, my illness, my upbringing, what sort of things I was in to, and the sense of emptiness I had inside. These things set the scene.
  • My conversion – I then share how I came to Jesus. I talk about how I was feeling in the year before coming to Jesus, the people who helped me and the story of Jesus coming to die on the cross for me.
  • How my life has changed – In this final section I share how knowing Jesus personally has changed my whole life and outlook. I talk about the love, acceptance, hope, joy and purpose I now feel inside.

For some of us we can not think of a time when you didn’t know Jesus. You can share things some of the things that God has done for you. I actually have several short testimonies that I share with people depending on the situation.

I have had times when someone has simply said, “Dave you are a Christian right? Why do you believe?” And I have shared a short testimony and a few days later they are saved.

3. Know relevant Bible verses

Knowing some relevant Bible verses can be really helpful when sharing your faith. Especially if it someone who has had previous exposure to the Bible or shows and interest in reading it.

I have found that if you just read the Book of Romans with someone you could explain God’s plan of salvation for them.

“Romans road” is a great place to start –

  • The Natural State Of Man – Romans 3:10 “As it is written, There is none righteous, no, not one”
  • The Reason – Romans 3:23 “For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God”
  • The Cause – Romans 5:12 “Therefore, just as sin entered the world through one man, and death through sin, and in this way death came to all people, because all sinned”
  • The Penalty and Gift – Romans 6:23 “For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord”
  • The Love of God – Romans 5:8 “But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.”
  • The Remedy – Romans 10:9-11 “If you declare with your mouth, “Jesus is Lord,” and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. 10 For it is with your heart that you believe and are justified, and it is with your mouth that you profess your faith and are saved.”
  • The Decision – Romans 10:13 “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.”

Work out a simple presentation by putting a few verses together and memorise them. You might like to write them in the back of your Bible so you can refer to them easily. If you can’t remember them all, remember the first one and put references to the next one in your margin of your Bible.

4. Have some evangelistic tools handy

There are a variety of evangelistic tools that you can use to reach people. Sometimes people seem to want to talk about things at the strangest times. Having something on hand can help in those situations. Here are a few examples –

  • Tracts – You can keep one handy in your purse or wallet just in case an opportunity arises. They are very handy if you don’t have much time or perhaps are a bit nervous about sharing your faith. You can even put a library pocket in the back of all your books. Instead of a library card, put a tract in it!
  • Websites – Look out for websites that may help you to reach your friends. Many websites have a “refer to a friend” page that sends an email message on your behalf bringing the site to their attention. You can also share things on Facebook for a wider audience.
  • DVDs – The “Jesus” video is a great way to reach people. In just over an hour you see the whole life of Christ and at the end if gives the opportunity to receive Christ as Lord and Saviour. You could buy one for yourself and one to give away! These days, it is available online to stream at www.Jesusfilm.org,

The most effective three things I have used is tracts my website passionaustralia.org and the Jesus movie. I have given away thousands of tracts and hundreds of Jesus videos and many people have been saved as a result. I have had ten of millions of visitors to my website.

As an example, one Jesus video was viewed by 66 people and many got saved. We gave one to a lady and she watched it and got saved. When her husband got home they watched it again. He got saved. When the kids came home, they watched it again and they got saved. The lady took it to her work and the residents of her nursing home all watched it. Many prayed to receive Jesus.

So one resource in your hand can make a huge difference. Like the fish and loaves in Jesus’ hands.

5. Learn the sinner’s prayer

The sinner’s prayer is a simple prayer that you can go through with someone to make their connection with Jesus Christ. It gives the person the opportunity to confess their sin to God and invite Jesus Christ into their lives as Lord and Saviour. There are two examples below that you can use or memorise.

From Billy Graham

Dear Lord Jesus, I know that I am a sinner, and I ask for Your forgiveness. I believe You died for my sins and rose from the dead. I turn from my sins and invite You to come into my heart and life. I want to trust and follow You as my Lord and Saviour. In Your Name. Amen

From Campus Crusade for Christ

Lord Jesus, I need You. Thank You for dying on the cross for my sins. I open the door of my life and receive You as my Saviour and Lord. Thank You for forgiving my sins and giving me eternal life. Take control of the throne of my life. Make me the kind of person You want me to be. Amen

Closing Summary

Today I wanted to encourage you in your evangelism efforts. The main point I hope you got is that you can be more effective in your efforts if you think and prepare beforehand. As we saw there are five things we can do.

1. Pray for people

2. Prepare a testimony

3. Learn key Bible verses

4. Have some resources ready

5. Learn the sinner’s prayer

Closing Prayer

Dear God,
I pray that You will use me to reach others for Christ. Please help me to be effective in sharing my faith. Please help me to know whom to talk to and I pray that You will give me the right words to say when the time comes. I pray for all my family, friends and neighbours. I pray that the Holy Spirit will draw them to Jesus and make them aware of their need for salvation. Please use me to lead them to Christ. I also pray Lord that when people come to You that You will help me to teach them about You and how to follow You each day. I pray that I will help make disciples.
I ask this in Jesus’, Amen.

Sermon: The Healing and Restoration of the Leper

Bible Readings: Matthew 4:23-25, Matthew 8:1-4

The title of my message today is the Healing and restoration of the Leper. It looks at Jesus’ amazing interaction with a Leper who approached Him and the result of what happened. This story is found in three of the Gospels – Matthew, Mark and Luke. Today I am going to focus on the Matthew version.

Today I want to I will look at some of the background teachings and contexts, then I will bring out some applications points that we can reflect on for today.

Breakdown and teaching on the text

Verse 1
Jesus came down out of the hills, where the Sermon on the Mount had been delivered, the great crowds still followed Him. There would have been many reasons why people would have followed Jesus. Some would have been amazed by His teaching. Some would have dared to believe He may be the promised Messiah that the Old Testament had prophesized about. Some would have just followed to see the miracle worker in action.

Verses 2
In verse two Jesus comes in contact with the Leper. As we will see later this is the first of eight miracles in Matthew 8 and 9. The Bible uses the term Leper to describe a number of skin diseases that were contagious. In Biblical times if people had leprosy they were declared unclean by the Priests and they lived outside the town in a leper camp until they died or got better. Leviticus 13:46 says that “As long as the serious disease lasts, they will be ceremonially unclean. They must live in isolation in their place outside the camp”. As it stood, the leper couldn’t work or live or interact with other people in the city. In fact, if he entered the city he had to cover his mouth and yell unclean, unclean wherever he went. If he failed to do so, he could be stoned to death. This is so people would not become infected with leprosy and religious Jews would not become ritually unclean. If it were in Our town today, they would have to live outside the town area where no-one could come in contact with them. Maybe behind the Peak. They would not be able to come into to town, to work, to come to church, or to see their family. I couldn’t imagine being in that situation today. For most of us our whole worlds revolve around these things.

In verse 2 we see this man “knelt” before Jesus in the NIV. The Greek world for knelt in the text, (pros-koo-neh-o), can also mean “worshiped.” Some translations actually translate it as “knelt and worshiped Jesus”. We also see in the passage the man used the title “Lord”. The word in Greek (koo-ree-os) means Lord, Master, Supreme Authority or Ruler. So we can see from these two things he held Jesus in high regard. The leper both knelt and worshiped Jesus and called Him Master. It was not a casual question asking for healing.

Verse 3
In verse 3 we also see this in the statement “If you are willing”. It reflects the leper’s great faith. We saw in the first reading that Jesus had already been teaching, preaching and healing all over the region and many people had already followed Him. The leper had no question about Jesus’ healing powers. The leper knew Jesus already had the authority and power to heal, He only needed to decide and act and his healing would come.

By touching an unclean leper, Jesus would become defiled and unclean according to Jewish custom (see Leviticus 13-14). But as Christians we know that when Jesus’ touches something, it cannot remain defiled or unclean. Far from becoming unclean Himself, Jesus makes the unclean leper clean and He makes him whole. We see that both Jesus’ words – I am willing – and Jesus’ touch are effective in showing the power and authority and healing of God. The Leper was healed and restored.

Verse 4
Jesus’ command for the leper to keep quite and go show himself to the Priests was about allowing the man to be acceptable to the community as a whole again. When someone had leprosy a Priest was the one who confirmed and sentenced them to live outside the city in isolation. Only a Priest could declare them clean and restore them to community life.

Leviticus 14:1-4 says “And the Lord said to Moses, 2 “The following instructions are for those seeking ceremonial purification from a skin disease. Those who have been healed must be brought to the priest, 3 who will examine them at a place outside the camp. If the priest finds that someone has been healed of a serious skin disease, 4 he will perform a purification ceremony.” This is why Jesus told him to do this. To prove the miracle and healing took place. It is interesting to note that in the Mark and Luke versions of the story, the man went and told everyone and did not show himself to the Priest.

Summary

So we see this miracle healing was done by Jesus out of compassion for the Leper and in response to his request, but it also had greater implications for him as a person. He was restored in body, he was restored to family and community life, and he was restored spiritually as he could attend the Temple once more.

Application points

So what can we learn from this passage? What can we use today? There are two things that both encourage and challenge me.

1. We need to bring our problems to Jesus.

This miracle is the first in a series of miracles that Jesus performs. If we read through Matthew chapters 8 and 9 we see there are eight recorded miracles of Jesus.

The man with leprosy (Matthew 8:1-4) – He knelt before Jesus and said if you are willing I will be healed. Jesus was willing and healed him.

The Centurion’s slave (Matthew 8:5-13) – He asked Jesus to “say the word” and his servant would be healed from a distance. Jesus said the word and he was healed.

The calming of the storm (Matthew 8:23-27) – The disciples were terrified as the storm on the lake threatened their lives. They called to Jesus and He stilled the storm.

The Paralytic man – (Matthew 9:1-8) – Some friends brought the paralytic man to Jesus in faith that He could heal him. Jesus told him to pick up his mat and go home. He got up and walked.

The Dead Girl (Matthew 9:18-26) – A man came to Jesus and told of his dead daughter. He said if you touch her, she will live. Jesus touched her and she lived.

The Sick Woman (Matthew 9:20-22) – The woman who had been bleeding non-stop for 12 years came to Jesus. She knew if she could touch His cloak she would be healed. She did and she was healed.

The Two Blind Men (Matthew 9:27-31) – Two blind men came asked Jesus to have mercy on them. He asked if they believed He could heal them. They said yes and they were healed.

The Mute Man (Matthew 9:32-33) – A man was brought to Jesus who was demon possessed and could not speak as a result. The demon was driven out and he was healed.

Jesus intervened in all of these situations and brought a miracle. For the Leper, Jesus was able to make the man whole in an instant. He had the power and the authority and as the leper found out, He had the will to do it. Whatever we are faced with today, we should bring it to Jesus like the Leper did in today’s passage. Prayer and bringing our problems to Jesus should be our first reaction, not a last resort.

The miracles in Matthew chapters 8 and 9 covered all things. There were healings, demons were caste out, a storm was calmed, and someone was even raised to life. Nothing is impossible for Jesus. Absolutely nothing. All things are possible to them that believes. If you are struggling with something today, bring it to Jesus in prayer. Come like the leper did, come humbly to the Master knowing He can intervene.

2. We see that Jesus did not treat people like outcasts.

One of the things I love about Jesus is that He is a Saviour for all people. In the Bible we see that He spent time with and reached out to people of all backgrounds and nationalities. He didn’t treat people as outcasts, not even lepers. Many times He healed and restored them to community life.

This is especially interesting because at the time Jesus walked the earth, many people only spent time with people from their own people group. They did not mix with others because in many cases they thought they were unclean. And there is no way someone would be seen with a leper. Jewish culture saw it as a curse from God.

But as we know, Jesus spent time with the Sadducees (Matthew 22:23), the Pharisees (Matthew 12:2-6), the Herodians (Matthew 22:15-22), the Romans (Luke 7:2), the Zealots (Luke 6:15) and the Samaritans (John 4:39-42). Combine this with Jesus spending time with other social outcasts of the day like tax collectors, prostitutes and lepers shows that Jesus was a Savior for all people. He didn’t discriminate. He just genuinely loved and cared for people, no matter whom they were or what they had done. He didn’t treat people as outcasts.

Many of us have probably heard about Mother Theresa and her work in the slums of Calcutta. Daily she dealt with the poorest of the poor. She even tended to lepers. Mother Teresa said this about serving God – “I see Jesus in every human being. I say to myself, this is hungry Jesus, I must feed him. This is sick Jesus. This one has leprosy or gangrene; I must wash him and tend to him. I serve because I love Jesus.” Seeing Jesus in the face of every person helped her to keep going when many others didn’t.

This is the type of person I believe Jesus wants us to be. He wants us to really love people, to care for them, He wants us to welcome them in no matter how different to us they are. He doesn’t want us to shun people or treat them as outcasts. He wants to embrace and heal them. He wants to do it through us. Jesus wants us to be His hands and feet to serve, His mouth to speak life, His heart to love and His arms to bring comfort. This is the person I want to be. WWJD – What would Jesus do? WSID – What should I do? WSWD – What should we do? We can’t treat people as outcasts, we need to embrace them in the way Jesus did and invite them to be part of our community.

Closing

So today as we move on to a time of fellowship, let us remember these two things for the healing of the Leper…

1. That we can bring all our problems to Jesus and He can help us. Nothing is impossible for Him.

2. That Jesus didn’t treat people like outcasts, He healed and welcomed them back to community.

Amen.